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Ulovane Update: Trainers Blog

11 Dec
4

Wildlife Wednesday: Gift of life – The season of babies I have decided to go with this title due to the last few weeks I have found the development of babies one of a very fascinating topic. There is so much change that happens over short time periods and at different stages different developments take […]

Wildlife Wednesday: Matriarch Special Bonobo (Pygmy Chimpanzees)

28 Aug
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Wildlife Wednesday: Women’s Month Matriarch Special Bonobo (Pygmy Chimpanzees). The name “bonobo” first appeared in 1954, when it was proposed as a new generic term for pygmy chimpanzees. The name is thought to be a misspelling on a shipping crate from the town of Bolobo on the Congo River, which was associated with the collection of chimps […]

Wildlife Wednesday: Matriarch Special Orca Whale

15 Aug
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Wildlife Wednesday: Women’s Month Matriarch Special The Orca Whale Orcas are highly social animals who purposefully and actively interact with one another using distinctive calls and whistles to communicate with one another. They’re highly intelligent animals, living in pods of up to 2 – 15 individuals. They have quite a long life span, living up […]

Wildlife Wednesday: Matriach Special Spotted Hyena

07 Aug
Lynne Harrison (3)

Wildlife Wednesday: Women’s Month Matriach Special Spotted Hyena – Crocuta crocuta Scientific name translations from either Latin or Greek are fascinating as they usually accurately describe one or more of the animals’ characteristics. In the case of the Spotted Hyaena, it translates to ‘saffron-coloured one’ in reference to its coat. This very misunderstood gregarious carnivore […]

Wildlife Wednesday: International Tiger Day

31 Jul
Johan Van Zyl photography

Our Tigers are still in danger. Since the beginning of the 20th century, we have lost over 95% of the world’s wild tiger population.  A very scary fact is that we have MORE tigers in captivity than there are roaming free in the wild. The reason we have lost so much of our wild tiger population […]